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The cold world of alpine climbing.

The cold world of alpine climbing.

Friday, January 6, 2012

*Alpine Mentors* and Steve House?

The American alpinist Steve House - © archive Steve House


"Alpine Mentors promotes alpinism by encouraging, coaching and climbing with technically proficient young alpinists who aspire to climb the worldʼs greatest mountains in a lightweight, low-impact style."

http://www.alpinementors.org/

I think this is a GREAT idea!

But it aint a give away either.

This is one of the questions on the application.

"You are climbing the 1938 route on the north face of the Eiger. The first day you manage to get to Death bivouac, half way up the route. That night a storm comes in and you are pinned down for 3 days. You started with three days of food and fuel, but by being careful, you have saved a small amount of both. You have a partner of equal experience, 6 cams, 4 pitons, 6 nuts, 4 ice screws, and 2 60 meter ropes. You have no radio or cell phone and no chance for outside help. It is 10 degrees F and has snowed 12" in the past 24 hours. What is going through your mind and what would you do?"

3 comments:

davesearle.me said...

Yer I had a brief look through this. Looks quite interseting, although this question did puzzled me somewhat. I would say prevention is better than cure. The weather forecasts are usually reliable enough in this area to avoid situations like this.

I would head for the Stollenjoch or down the route if I was there. It would be a living nightmare situation to be in but still not impossible to get yourself out of, especially with such a big rack!! ;-)

Julian said...

It's definitely an interesting question. To me, reading it over and not having thought about it for too much time, the biggest concern I would have is the avalanche danger from all the new snow. So the choice of what to do next, whether it be retreat or climb upwards, would be predicated on whatever option would require the minimal amount of time spent in avalanche zones. I'd need to know more about the Eiger's topography to answer that.

Of course, I could be completely on the wrong track with this comment. :)

gran-ten-nae said...

I sent this to a friend currently in Patagonia who would be perfect! Thanks for the heads up Dane!