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The cold world of skimo & alpine climbing

The cold world of skimo & alpine climbing

Tuesday, September 17, 2013

Patagonia Rover approach shoe give away?

 




Ya, I got a free pair of shoes this morning.  Two pair actually.  One for me to test and write up and a 2nd pair to give to one of you.

Now I of course have never won anything in my life.....other than stuff I worked hard at to earn.

You on the other hand can get a free pair of shoes, in your size too!  Simply tell me why you should get them and not my wife or my buddy Dave, in the comment section below for all of us to read.

The catch?  Ya gotta be a registered member of the blog to get them and write me that story.  I'll then pick the story that most impresses me for what ever reason that moves my fancy that day.  That ONE writer will get one free pair of the new Patagonia shoes!   Kinda cool, right?

The shoe?  More to come, but a seriously  minimalistic approach shoe.  Light weight and  rigged to easily carry.  If I can't actually climb SCW in them (and some could easy enough)  it sure would make getting off the thing much easier. 

Patagonia's spiel:

The Mountain Mobility collection includes performance footwear informed by the Patagonia athletes’ need for highly functional and versatile footwear in the mountains, be it ultra runners who go vertical or climbing ambassadors who need to shed weight without compromising performance.  The Rover (and what I have and will be giving away) combines the best qualities of a minimalist trail runner with a  lightweight approach shoe. Designed to feel the terrain, the Rover  utilizes a to-the-toe  variable lacing system to improve footing for vertical endeavors and comfort for jarring descents. The proprietary dual-zone outsole has climbing rubber in forefoot for high performance grip combined with deeper lugs, and burlier rubber in the mid to rear foot for increased traction on loose terrain as well as increased durability. The abrasion-resistant air mesh and synthetic leather upper wraps the
foot, while a self-centering stretch gusseted tongue keeps debris out. A soft flexing 4mm drop midsole provides a natural foot strike and an ESS forefoot plate protects the foot from rugged terrain.

My 2 minute take prior to a full review?  A real, no chit, minimalistic running/approach shoe.   And you will feel the terrain through these!   If that is your thing..and it is mine for the most part, should be a good fit.  Pun intended.

Certainly a take off of the the Munson last I think.  More here:
http://coldthistle.blogspot.com/2011/12/russell-moccasin-co-and-minimalist.html

This is not a cush shoe.  If all that appeals to you these should fill a spot in your gear room.  More to come.  Available at retail by late Nov. '13 I am being told.

Now tell me YOUR story!

all greta stories...I gave up trying to choose and we di a random draw.comment #17 won....

18 comments:

Greenezo said...

Hey Dane,
I'd like to give the shoes a go. Simply would be interested and happy to try something out and report back on how it works for me. I've found many of the gear/technique theories on CT to be helpful in my own climbing pursuits and would be glad to contribute some of my own experiences back into the community.
Cheers,
Ben

Mike Milillo said...

Hey Dane,

To be honest, I like gear and free gear is even better. Beyond that, I'd put these shoes through the wringer. I'd likely wear them to class everyday through the heart of the British Columbia rainy season and take them on the trails of Squamish every weekend. I'm currently rocking some pretty grungy New Balance Minimuses, one of the first post five finger minimalist shoes. Unfortunately, as a newly minted grad student I'll be holding onto those for as long as I possibly can. UNLESS, I find myself lucky enough to earn a free pair of Patagonia Rovers (in an 8.5).

Patagonia is also one of those companies I fully approve of and several of their products are top of the line. Among my current favorites are the Patagonia Alpine Guide pants and I'd love to pick up the R1 3/4 zip hoody (hint hint, if you're reading this Patagonia a medium orange would be great).

Other than that, I believe you owe me some skins. So you might as well save on the shipping and package it all together.

Cheers,

Mike

Jon Miller said...

Dane,
Glad Patagonia Footwear hooked you up. (Not the same company as Patagonia just so everyone knows)

The Rover's are a pretty nice shoe. I got a pair at OR (the joys of being in retail). So far I've led 5.8 and TRed 5.10 in them. As you say, super minimal, you feel everything in them, good and bad. Really light weight! I will be interested to see your feelings about them as well as the lucky person who gets to put them through the ringer. The "approach shoe" category is a difficult one for companies to hit.

Jon

Me said...

Hi Dane -

It's going to be tough going up against your wife and Dave but I'll give it a shot(don't they already have awesome approach shoes anyway??). My "story"? Started climbing rock and ice 4 years ago (age - 40) and just started to trail run this year. I'd like to get out of my shredded pair of road runners - remnants of which I think I left on the approach to Mt Rainier a few weeks ago. Problem is, there are so many choices of "trail" footwear I don't know where to start. Maybe these will be my go to shoe? Who knows..let's find out!

Seriously - thanks for the great reviews and commentary. I've learned alot here!

Kyle

Alpinglow84 said...

Hi Dane,

I would love to try out these new approach shoes. Especially since my last pair just bit the dust and were retired recently. They were Sportiva superflys that I had used for over 12 years (resoled once). I'm definitely hurting for some new kicks, but can continue using my Altras should you choose someone else as the winner.
Thanks,
Philip

Unknown said...

Hi Dane, been reading your blog for the last 2 years, lots of great info and it helped me with some purchases (blueice boa leash and the piton hybrid hoody, pretty much the best fleece I ever had, so happy to have found it on your website and to get the cool looking blue/green/orange version :) )

Where was I ? Oh yeah, I'd really like to get a pair of Patagonia Rovers. Been running in minimalist shoes the last two seasons. I have some joint mobility issue from an old injury but the minimalist design helps with movement since the soles are usually way more flexible than traditionnal shoes.

Also worth mentionning that I never had a proper "approach shoe" so I'd be really interested to try some.

That's pretty much it, hope to see new boots review. I'm currently using an old a pair of Scarpa Charmoz for ice climbing in Quebec but really need to replace them.

jp




SG said...

My backyard consists of giant upturned plates of beautifully featured sandstone conglomerate, and steep foothills striped with classic running trails. Some dude said that 'the best easy climb in the universe' is there. Some other dude,an uber-efficient jesus doppleganger, links together 110 pitches of climbing there in a few hours using a hybrid style he calls 'scrunbling'--running and scrambling.
I'll never do anything as grand as either one of those dudes, but I'm pretty confident that I love my backyard (OK, I share it with a few folks) just as much as they do. I've lived at the base of the boulder flatirons for most of the last 7 years and I never get tired of playing here. By the looks of it, these shoes were made for this style of play (or scrunbling, if you prefer).

Most of my humble 'objectives' these days involve some variation of this activity. Further west, in the indian peaks and rocky mountain national park, there's endless classic scrambles and mountaineering routes. Ridge running is my favorite style of transportation on these routes. Going fast and light (runners kit) allows you to linkup several of these smaller scrambles and cover a lot of beautiful territory before the afternoon T-storms move in. Carrying in a pair of climbing shoes, or running in approach shoes takes a lot of the fun and efficiency out of this style. It feels more liberating to run in and just keep moving (albeit slower) as the terrain turns vertical, with just a shell jacket around your waste or a running vest. The problem is finding a shoe that runs well and climbs decent (no need to run to your 5.13 proj). I've been on a search for such a shoe for a while, and nothing quite fills that dual-role. Could it be the Rover? I'd love to find out.

Thanks for the awesome blog Dane, and sorry for the e-tome.

Anonymous said...

This year I started to guide on Crimea rock.

Not for money, but solely for personal satisfaction.

When does it come from?

For me, seeing how a person from urban areas finally throws away a "virtual city" they tend to carry with them even to mountains now-a-days, widens his or her narrow tunnel of perception that ubiquitous city noise dictates, and finally starts to embrace the wilderness, is really rewarding.

I'm trying to make them see that the mountains ARE alive (mainly because of water, sun, and absence of human hordes, that is), and to show them, megalopolis dwellers, the difference in attention needed to be safe on trad vs. their usual "urban attention". Because IMO even seconding on trad, one needs to be FULLY aware not only of the patch of rock they're on, but also what's above, below and aside, as well as the weather, what's their bodies say to them, how subjective time is perceived and - more important - the LIFE that boils all around them, unlike in their usual "death zone" of pavements, plastic thrash and concrete walls.

Sometimes I succeed, and my partners (can't call them "clients" really, moreover they belay me) are struck and amazed at the contrast between living here-and-now-in-the-middle-of-it and their usual in-the-shell state. My biggest successes are when they also have some kind of revelation about what humanity is actually doing to environment. Sometimes I fail. That's when the shell won't open, or they aren't talking a word about wild life. But nevertheless I try, and more or less it is morally rewarding.

While guiding, I'm also teaching my partners of what I know about trad, and "leave no trace" principle is enforced in my groups.

For sure it takes time, physical ability, and gear to guide like so.

We're on 5.6-5.8 type of terrain mostly, no major routes (read: long approaches), and right now I'm kinda forced to use floppy Keen Hewport H2 sandals on approach and descend, despite they're not the best in that role, especially so given heavy pack (two 9mm ropes, naturally, and a lot of gear - guiding, you have to protect even moderate traverses every few meters). I change to my rock shoes early on ascent - can't climb securely in sandals :-(

That's some dead weight, and it needs to be changed.

My options are: bring full-on trekking boot (hot, more secure, but even more weight, so I won't) or get some decent approach shoe. I guess I'd be able to confidently climb up to 5.3 in my Zamberlan Vioz+ (that is all I have, not counting winter doubles), but I'm hoping that 5.6 will be manageable with approach shoes (my current abilities in rock shoes are between 5.11b and c). Less weight also, so I should be able to bring people on routes more often that way. Been eyeing LS Ganda and Boulder X, but... Too pricey (remember, that's 3rd world here), and no good sale %% - can't afford them yet. Moreover, I'd better spend my $ buying a product from company that actually cares about environment.

So, if You think that the values I'm trying to promote are important - then I'm the best candidate for a pair of Rovers.

Anonymous said...

p.s. As for CT - been a frequent visitor from 2010; learned a lot. Thank You for that.

Mykhaylo Slobodyan said...

p.p.s. Don't know why "(o) Google Account" knob doesn't work. Anyway I hope You see my IP in logs.

Unknown said...

I am not a hardman. If you are reading this, your warm-up is probably my project.

There is no beautiful sandstone conglomerate in my backyard. There is however, an ongoing construction project. I am surrounded by urban sprawl. It's a loong loooong loooooooong way to the closest climbing.*

I am weak and pathetic. Moderate approaches are physically grueling and leave me shattered before even making it to the climb. Even roadside crags leave my legs trembling and achey... rank neophytes scoff at my super-human efforts to climb gnarly routes like "fluffy bunny arete" or "it's ok, we aren't all meant to do this sport gully" (remember, your warm-up is probably my project).

Moving closer to the crags? Seeking professional instruction? Exercising more and training my body for the demands of the sport? Nah... obviously the solution is lighter approach shoes!

*At least 2 miles to the gym, and 4 to actual bouldering and top-roping... how can anyone realistically expect one to ever get out climbing?!

Dane said...

OK, that was funny. What you living my life too :)

PurpleJesus1994 said...

Fucking Cooke you are a clown. Love you man!

pcooke said...

I can't seem to edit the name associated with my last post, so I'll try reposting it now that I've set up the account properly:

I am not a hardman. If you are reading this, your warm-up is probably my project.

There is no beautiful sandstone conglomerate in my backyard. There is however, an ongoing construction project. I am surrounded by urban sprawl. It's a loong loooong loooooooong way to the closest climbing.*

I am weak and pathetic. Moderate approaches are physically grueling and leave me shattered before even making it to the climb. Even roadside crags leave my legs trembling and achey... rank neophytes scoff at my super-human efforts to climb gnarly routes like "fluffy bunny arete" or "it's ok, we aren't all meant to do this sport gully" (remember, your warm-up is probably my project).

Moving closer to the crags? Seeking professional instruction? Exercising more and training my body for the demands of the sport? Nah... obviously the solution is lighter approach shoes!

*At least 2 miles to the gym, and 4 to actual bouldering and top-roping... how can anyone realistically expect one to ever get out climbing?!

Andreas Renner said...

HeiHei Dane.

I don't think the shoes are very pretty, in fact I think they are ugly as hell, like most patagonia stuff is.
My last approach shoes just fell apart this summer. They were also not very pretty, worked though. I won't be buying new ones. Not this year and not next year. Not because I could not a afford a pair of shoes, but because I already spend more than a grand (in euros, in dollars it would probably be closer to two) on equipment. To blame that on you wouldnt be fair, but I do hold your blog partially responsible.
So for the next rockclimbing trip I will probably take some old ballet style slippers, very lightweight, somewhat dangerous and not comfortable at all. They will do and I am quite positive that I won't slip to death at the descent. Or I'll just rappel more.
If you would send me a free pair of Patagonia Rovers in 42 (euro size)to Vienna I would use them (sometimes reluctantly, lets face it, ballet shoes are crazy lightweight) and would be quite happy about them.
cheers,
andi

Tim Brose said...

Dane,
I need a pair of those because I blew my shoe/boot budget(for several years) on some LS Nepals and a pair of Scarpa 6000s I found for 'cheap'.
Oh, did I mention that this was after I started reading your blog?
:D

Andy Watterson said...

The yellow would be a great compliment to my, bare, cherry-red ass while running "minimalist" style up local ski hills while the lifts are running.

Light is right.
It's all about the up.
New'd Alpinism.

Jesse Morehouse said...

Roses are red, violets are blue
I moved and lost my approach shoes
Teachers are poor and with kids to boot
The hookup karma will make you feel cute

Hard to believe with an 80s head band on
And TLT toe flex in your ice crampon

-Jesse